Best 547 Quotes & Tweets on Product

Twitter wisdom in your inbox

1

It sucks when you’ve got a new product idea and your customer research proves that your assumptions were wrong and no one really wants your product. It sucks way more when you don’t do any research and spend months (or years) building the wrong thing.

Katelyn Bourgoin

Katelyn Bourgoin

@KateBour

2

The person who learns the most in any classroom is the teacher. Lesson: If you really want to learn a topic, then “teach” it. Write a book. Teach a class. Build a product. Start a company. The act of making something will force you to learn more deeply than reading ever will.

James Clear

James Clear

@JamesClear

3

There’s never been a better time to launch a digital product.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

4

People don't want to use your software. They want to lose weight, laugh, be entertained, get smarter, spend time with loved ones, go home on time, sleep adequately, eat good food, be happy. Your product is only as good as the experiences it enables people to have.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

5

The product is the résumé for the team.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

6

Your customers don't care about your product, they care about their problems.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

7

You can only iterate on something after it’s been released. Prior to release, you’re just making the thing. Even if you change it, you’re just making it. Iterating is when you change/improve after it’s out. So if you want to iterate, SHIP.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

8

Formula for startup success: Find large highly fragmented industry w low NPS; vertically integrate a solution to simplify value product.

Keith Rabois

Keith Rabois

@rabois

9

Reasons your product will fail: 1. Too complex 2. Can’t easily be described 3. Didn’t iterate fast enough 4. Bland 5. Failed to launch into a community 6. Doesn’t save time/money 7. Poor design 8. Does too much 9. Didn’t take a feature risk 10. Listened to wrong the customers

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

10

Work on a product you’d buy yourself, then go sell it to everyone like yourself.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

11

In year one you likely don’t need: - A fancy office - A full-time assistant - An office / ops mgr - 2000+ sqft of office space - Fancy furniture - Lots of employees (> 10) - Perfect design What you do need: A product people love in spite of its flaws. The rest will come.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

12

Competing with everyone: $10/hr Competing with a few: $100/hr Selling a product: $1,000/hr Building equity: $10,000/hr Making a market: $100,000/hr

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

13

Create things you wish people created for you.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

14

When making something new that clearly competes with something that exists, gravity will pull you towards trying to do everything they do PLUS the new stuff you want to do. I’d encourage you steer clear of feature parity. Instead, handle common struggles in novel, unique ways.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

15

If you have time to consume, you have time to produce.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

16

Before you ask for readers, write the article you wish you could read. Before you ask for the sale, create the product you wish you had. Before you need support, be the supportive friend. Before you need love, be the loving partner. Always give value before you ask for value.

James Clear

James Clear

@JamesClear

17

As a founder, your primary product is clarity.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

18

Things you don't need to launch your product: a great name, a one-word domain, a beautiful logo, an ever better website, brilliant copy, perfect code, custom illustrations, shiny buttons, optimized CSS… Things you do need: a product that solves a problem for someone. That's it.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

19

Time spent honing the pitch is better spent working on the product. Good investors use your pitch to size you up, not to understand or appreciate the business.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

20

Good design is not picking colors and making it pretty Good design is removing steps, understanding motivations, making it clearer, more navigable, faster, easier... it is how it works not how it looks. Too many products (even at the largest firms in tech) forget this.

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

21

from a founder i really respect: "the hardest thing for me to learn was that the market does not care about effort or struggle, only output"

Sam Altman

Sam Altman

@sama

22

The more the product is a commodity, the more the brand matters. For example, celebrities branding alcohol and VCs branding money.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

23

We really shouldn't be surprised that Google has turned their search engine into an ad engine. This is the basic, predictable playbook of monopoly power. Once the quality of the product stops mattering, because all competition has been vanquished, you raise prices. This is it.

DHH

DHH

@dhh

24

Many of the best product people I know are historians of our industry. They can tell you about features built by companies big & small many years ago. Their intuition is guided by years of studying failure and success. The sooner you become a historian, the better you’ll be.

Jeff Morris Jr.

Jeff Morris Jr.

@jmj

25

Build a product to solve your own problem. That way you'll have at least one user – more than most startups ever get.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

26

If you want to feel good, brainstorm it. If you want to appear good, test it. If you want to know if you’re any good, ship it.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

27

Most product-focused CEOs think that if you build it, they will come ⚾️ In reality, if a tree falls in a forest and there's nobody around to hear it....nobody hears it 🌲🌲🌲 Marketing matters.

Andrew Wilkinson

Andrew Wilkinson

@awilkinson

28

Making great products isn't about adding more, more, more. It's often about discovering a single great problem and working to refine, refine, refine.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

29

When choosing a startup idea, you must be able to check either of these boxes [ ] Truly novel (nobody else has tried) [ ] 10X better product The absolute best check both. 99% of startups check neither. A good pitch is sometimes a strong story explaining how to get the 1st ☑️

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

30

Engagement is a toxic metric. Products which optimize for it become worse. People who optimize for it become less happy. It also seems to generate runaway feedback loops where most engagable people have a) worst individual experiences and then b) end up driving the product bus.

Patrick McKenzie

Patrick McKenzie

@patio11

31

When prototyping, always try wackier/quirkier stuff first. The deeper you get into a project, the more conservative it tends to get. Stranger ideas are more at home earlier in the process.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

32

I wholeheartedly reject the notion that every product must solve a problem (I hear this a lot from investors) Our lives are busy, noisy & difficult, there exist a class of products that aim to delight & displace people from reality These products have a place in our world too

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

33

First-time founders care most about product. Second-time founders care most about distribution.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

34

A/B testing culture guiding product is a clear signal the company is out of new ideas.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

35

You can do big things with small teams, but you can't do small things with big teams. And small things are often all that’s necessary.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

36

Speed is a near universal value in most startups: speed to ship, speed of initial ux, speed of the app loading, speed of decision making, speed of hiring or firing, speed of customer support. Speed is your best defense while you have no moat.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

37

You can skip all the parties, all the conferences, all the press, all the tweets. Build a great product and get users and win.

Sam Altman

Sam Altman

@sama

38

Build many things to find the one you should have been building all along.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

39

Stop talking about features and start talking about benefits.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

40

No one cares about your product. Who built it, its features, the origin story — it’s all superfluous. People only find value in what your product can do for them right now. Save people time. Save people money. Give people an escape. The selfish hand will always govern.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

41

Product is what you believe, marketing is how you get other people to believe it.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

42

Great products are built by saying no 99% of the time. Great teams are built by saying no 99% of the time. Great portfolios are built by saying no 99% of the time.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

43

My advice to first-time info product creators: 1. Start with a very small product. 2. Choose a topic you know well that will almost write itself. Avoid doing research. 3. Timebox production to 2 weeks. 4. Charge $10. 5. Promote it. All the lessons are in #5. Best of luck

Daniel Vassallo

Daniel Vassallo

@dvassallo

44

If your consumer app isn’t being used while someone sits on the toilet, it’s probably not going to work.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

45

Build a product to solve your own problem, then hire your customers to solve their own problems.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

46

I’m starting to believe nothing should be designed in a day. A design needs to stand up to fresh eyes in the morning.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

47

People buy stories not products.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

48

A great product with bad marketing is no longer a great product

Matthew Kobach

Matthew Kobach

@mkobach

49

Best career advice I have: learn BOTH how to build things and how to understand people (to create products for them, manage them, etc.)

Sam Altman

Sam Altman

@sama

50

Make a product people love, and make it super easy for them to delete their accounts. Build a company people want to work for, and make it super easy for them to leave. Anything else delays the inevitable.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl