Best 42 Quotes & Tweets on Launch

Twitter wisdom in your inbox

1

There’s never been a better time to launch a digital product.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

2

The Lindy Effect for startups: The longer you go without shipping product, the more likely you will never ship product.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

3

Things you don't need to launch your product: a great name, a one-word domain, a beautiful logo, an ever better website, brilliant copy, perfect code, custom illustrations, shiny buttons, optimized CSS… Things you do need: a product that solves a problem for someone. That's it.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

4

I am pretty sure the biggest difference between a startup and a large company is the anxiousness one feels if they haven’t shipped something meaningful in a week. In a large company it is totally acceptable for an 6+ mo project to not ship. That cannot happen in a startup.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

5

If you want to start a tech company and aren't a maker, find a brilliant technologist and become their API to the rest of the world.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

6

Speed is a near universal value in most startups: speed to ship, speed of initial ux, speed of the app loading, speed of decision making, speed of hiring or firing, speed of customer support. Speed is your best defense while you have no moat.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

7

You will be embarrassed of what you ship after a weekend. You will be embarrassed of what you ship after nine years. Ship.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

8

Shipping speed is a leading indictator of success. Applies to people. Applies to startups. Bet on people who move fast, make things, and learn from feedback.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

9

Don’t launch something too pretty. It may lead you to thinking you have product-market fit but you may actually just have design-designers fit.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

10

If you want to grow a thick skin, ship anything at all.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

11

You'll learn more from one launch than a thousand blog posts.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

12

The next time a product launches you don’t admire instead of trashing it pause. Think about the sacrifices that were made to get that live. Someone’s mom went to school at night, maybe worked two jobs so their kid could reach for the stars one day. We are all in this together.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

13

Two important vectors to build momentum in a startup are listening to users & shipping speed. To listen well, you'll need to constantly talk to users & be picky about who to serve. To ship quickly, you have to scope just enough & have good instincts about how to solve the problem

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

14

Here's what I've learned about launching online products. 1. Give tons of free stuff away. The Internet rewards people who teach. Share your best ideas for free, and you will attract an audience of like-minded people. Build an audience before you launch your first product.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

15

When you rush at the end, it’s not the end’s fault, it’s the beginning and middle’s fault.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

16

It’s okay to launch your app with only a handful of invited users. Don’t let anyone pressure you into scaling because they think you’re being elitist—making a few people happy is critical at the beginning. When the product is great & everyone is using it, that noise won’t matter.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

17

"Early and often" has been a very effective mantra for me… Ship code early and often. Communicate early and often. Ask for feedback early and often. Share your best ideas early and often. If you're not already, consider doing things earlier and more often!

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

18

I don't like coding that much. I don't like designing that much. I don't like product management that much. But I *love* having shipped a product people love.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

19

Schools are moving online. Ship Fast, Ship Often: Traditional school is too passive. Students learn best when they make things. The more students create, the faster they’ll learn.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

20

Rapid shipping cadence is essential. If you don’t ship, you don’t learn. When you don’t learn, you become a product speculator. I know zero successful product speculators.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

21

Create lots of mediocre work, but only publish the top 10%

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

22

When do I know is the right time to ship a product? When your product has fulfilled the promise you set out to achieve for the customer. It’s not about features. It’s not about sprints. It’s not about dates. All that matters is you believe the promise is answered.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

23

Write every day. Publish one article per week. Read one incredible book per month. Do it for 4 years and you’ll learn more than the average college graduate.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

24

You can always build less to ship product faster.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

25

For product people of all kinds (e.g. designers, PMs, devs) it’s far better to get lots of repetitions early in your career rather than focusing on big releases. Ship for yourself, for your Mom, for your friends, for your community — and ship often. It’s the only way to improve.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

26

Electron should send an brand-impairment invoice to all the memory-hogging, fan-spinning monstrosities that have been shipped under its brand. It’s amazing that so many apps have gotten away with bloat murder because Electron absorbed all the blame.

DHH

DHH

@dhh

27

Most projects that are 70% done are not released because they aren’t perfect yet. However, if you edited down what you have to its very essence, you’d probably stand to gain 90% of the impact if you just released that to the world.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

28

Customers don't care about your technical debt even when that's why you can't ship.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

29

Choosing a product ship date is like predicting the weather.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

30

Red flag for consumer products: Trying to solve too many problems at launch when it’s usually better to do one thing really, really well

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

31

Above all else, rapid shipping cadence is the definitive success variable.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

32

Shipping, the greatest creative joy.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

33

Some of the things you do in the final few months before launching something brand new: Second guess, change, change back, hone, edit, tweak, cut, sneak in, wonder, defend, promote, remind, rethink, bet, guess, get goosebumps, hold back, push forward, and go!

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

34

One downside of raising a lot of money pre-launch is it's incredibly easy to tell yourself you're not ready to launch for a litany of product deficiencies while burning cash until it's too late. When you have little money, you often have to launch to get traction to get money.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

35

There's no feeling like shipping. It's such a RELEASE 😄

DHH

DHH

@dhh

36

Being wicked smart/creative won’t shield you launching stuff that flops. The market doesn’t care how clever you are. All they care about is well you solve their problems.

Katelyn Bourgoin

Katelyn Bourgoin

@KateBour

37

Perfectionism is just procrastination with a snooty accent. Just ship it already.

Katelyn Bourgoin

Katelyn Bourgoin

@KateBour

38

Shipments speak louder than words.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

39

It is possible to ship software on time.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

40

I love shipping code. And now that we're profitable instead of growth-crazed, it's nice to not feel guilty for doing it.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

41

"How do I validate that my validation technique is valid?!" 🤣 Stop validating, and start shipping. Make small bounded bets, then take what works, and ignore the rest.

Daniel Vassallo

Daniel Vassallo

@dvassallo

42

Want to make a living as an author? Then treat it like a business, not a lottery ticket. You need to have an idea of how you're going to produce it, distribute it, promote it, etc. Nothing is certain, but you need a strategy. And "write it and they will come" is not a good one.

Daniel Vassallo

Daniel Vassallo

@dvassallo