Best 87 Quotes & Tweets on Feedback

Twitter wisdom in your inbox

1

Take feedback from nature and markets, not from people.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

2

Ask for feedback on your attempts, not advice on your ideas.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

3

All systems insulated from feedback from free markets or natural forces eventually get corrupted.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

4

Start making small investments early in life: • Takes many failures to figure it out • Best investments have long feedback loops • Capital : labor ratio generally increases in life • Can improve all the way through old age

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

5

When feedback is immediate, clear, and concrete, people learn quickly. When feedback is delayed, abstract, and opaque, people rarely learn.

James Clear

James Clear

@JamesClear

6

You can learn basically anything for free. The things you should pay for: feedback/mentorship, access to a network, a forcing function to be disciplined.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

7

A pattern I’ve seen repeat over and over again: Ask a lot of people for feedback, get stuck. Ask a few people for feedback, get moving.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

8

I read somewhere that there are only two reasons we give feedback: - To cut someone down - To help them grow I try and go through that mental check each time I give someone feedback.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

9

I've been testing a new response to whenever the kids complain. The formula is [acknowledge], [opportunity]. It’s incredible how well it works. Works on adults too.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

10

Great customer support will get you: - A cult following - A better product through customer feedback - A humbled team It might be more important than having a great product!

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

11

Shipping speed is a leading indictator of success. Applies to people. Applies to startups. Bet on people who move fast, make things, and learn from feedback.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

12

I’ve never met a good product person who didn’t want anything but absolutely brutal feedback on their work

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

13

Building a product for others: - Starting with zero customers - Painfully slow feedback loop - Customers don’t tell you what they really want Building a product for yourself: - Starting with one customer - you! - Infinitely fast feedback loop - Little to no miscommunication

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

14

Successful people: - Have an environment that removes the need for willpower. - Seek and implement critical feedback. - Put themselves in uncomfortable situations. - Spend more time as students than teachers.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

15

Ask people all the time for feedback. Make your asks specific, and your tone curious so it's safe for the other person to tell something critical.

Julie Zhuo

Julie Zhuo

@joulee

16

The key to getting better is learning from feedback. The problem is that most of us stop looking for feedback when we get good enough.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

17

It doesn’t cost you anything to tell someone about something you truly believe they are good at. In fact, it creates tons of value for that person and for you.

Julie Zhuo

Julie Zhuo

@joulee

18

All learning is dependent on feedback. The faster the feedback, the faster you can learn. Thus, in many domains, the individual, team, or organization with the fastest feedback cycle is the one that wins.

James Clear

James Clear

@JamesClear

19

It’s too simple is the greatest compliment a product can ever be paid.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

20

The next time a product launches you don’t admire instead of trashing it pause. Think about the sacrifices that were made to get that live. Someone’s mom went to school at night, maybe worked two jobs so their kid could reach for the stars one day. We are all in this together.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

21

Startups should be scary, not dangerous. Scary: pivoting, getting critical feedback, managing people smarter than yourself Dangerous: raking up credit card debt, sacrificing your health and wellbeing

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

22

Do not improve your product based on the feedback of those who do not use your product. Improve your product by talking to the people who already use your product, but aren't in love with it. Reward early adopters, who in turn will reward you with more users.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

23

Writing a lot won’t make you a better writer. If it did everybody who answers 100 emails per day would write like Hemmingway. If you want to improve your writing, listen to critical feedback, read great books, and spend a lot of time *re-writing* your sentences.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

24

So many advantages in life follow from understanding that immediate positive feedback rarely leads to desired long term results.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

25

How to conduct 1-1s, a simple framework Tell your direct reports what you think they should: - Start doing - Stop doing - Continue doing Ask them what you should: - Start doing - Stop doing - Continue doing Do this often enough that you’re not worried about too much feedback.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

26

Dishonest “sugarcoated” feedback will surely poison your product & culture. Honest “raw” feedback—which at times will be very negative—will surely strengthen your product & culture (if delivered with class). No matter how badly it stings, always deliver honest feedback.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

27

If you really appreciate a product existing, tell its creators. They may not know. They may feel like giving up. Your note might make their day, and maybe even provide them with the energy to keep going!

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

28

When the period of time between action and feedback is short, speed matters. The biggest risk is moving too slow and not iterating fast enough. When the period of time between action and feedback is long, judgment matters. The biggest risk is moving too fast.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

29

Most ideas die from the overvaluation of negative feedback.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

30

"Early and often" has been a very effective mantra for me… Ship code early and often. Communicate early and often. Ask for feedback early and often. Share your best ideas early and often. If you're not already, consider doing things earlier and more often!

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

31

When feedback loops are short, the number of iterations matters. It's not what you know, but how quickly you can learn. When feedback loops are long, existing knowledge matters. It's not what you can learn, but what you already know.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

32

The Learning Loop To better understand learning, let's break it into four components. 1. Experience 2. Reflection 3. Abstraction/Lesson 4. Action This process creates a feedback loop so that you are continuously adapting and learning from your (or others) experiences.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

33

Three steps to improve your writing: 1) Write for 60 minutes every day. 2) Publish one article every week. 3) Listen to feedback. Do it for a year and you'll be an excellent writer.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

34

Early in your career, you should solve your own problems. The super-quick customer feedback loop (with yourself) will make you really good, really fast. After you get really good, solve other people's problems.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

35

Our greatest bias is the ability to protect our egos against feedback that uncovers reality.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

36

Failure is free feedback.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

37

One of the greatest feelings as a product person is when someone you don’t know says, “I use your product and like it.”

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

38

The distorted feedback you get in open source, a vocal minority of rage and a silent majority of use, is why you need internal satisfaction.

DHH

DHH

@dhh

39

Publish something new every day. A song, a video, a tweet, a drawing, an article. It doesn't matter. On the Internet, it costs nothing to create or distribute your ideas. Even better, you get instant feedback which makes you better at your craft. Build the habit of publishing.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

40

The most important lesson learned working with artists is creativity is not on-demand, linear, or to be planned for in a roadmap. Listen & learn what conditions captured the brilliance. Trust the creative. Give them space. Create process for feedback. It’s art not business.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

41

There’s more to learn from people that don’t use your product rather than the people who do.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

42

The biggest difference between deliberate practice and simple repetition? Feedback. Measurement raises awareness and accelerates learning.

James Clear

James Clear

@JamesClear

43

Instead of asking customers what they’d like to see in the future, instead ask what they’d like removed.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

44

If someone inspired you, tell them. This business thang is hard. But nothing brightens your day like unsolicited praise.

Katelyn Bourgoin

Katelyn Bourgoin

@KateBour

45

Beyond technical ability, I look for these characteristics in candidates: - Communicates well (everyone always knows what they're up to) and asks for feedback early and often - Self-motivated to solve problems and find new ones - Manages up (tells me how to best empower them)

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

46

The more people you listen to about your product, the further you travel from the truth.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

47

Ambitious people need two things: 1. More direct feedback. 2. Encouragement to raise their aspirations. People with fast feedback loops and a supportive set of peers are unstoppable.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

48

Teachers can learn from professional sports coaches: • Measure performance • Personalized training programs • Students improve by doing • Fast feedback loops • Inspiring goal to train for My best coaches had ultra-high standards because we shared wins and losses together.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

49

"Success" is getting stuck in the right feedback loop.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

50

The most helpful conversations I've had when building a startup are the ones with smart people that *don't* like my idea. Having the curiosity to learn about the future they perceive has always led me to learn something I didn't previously understand well enough but needed to.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail