Best 36 Quotes & Tweets on Features

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1

When making something new that clearly competes with something that exists, gravity will pull you towards trying to do everything they do PLUS the new stuff you want to do. I’d encourage you steer clear of feature parity. Instead, handle common struggles in novel, unique ways.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

2

A lack of product-market-fit is never solved with more features.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

3

Making great products isn't about adding more, more, more. It's often about discovering a single great problem and working to refine, refine, refine.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

4

Stop talking about features and start talking about benefits.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

5

No one cares about your product. Who built it, its features, the origin story — it’s all superfluous. People only find value in what your product can do for them right now. Save people time. Save people money. Give people an escape. The selfish hand will always govern.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

6

Junior product teams obsess over creating features. Senior product teams obsess over eliminating features.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

7

People underestimate how much grit it takes for founders to steadily build the most monotonous features in order to make an okay product great. Especially difficult when there are so many more interesting/intellectually challenging v1 ideas to distract you.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

8

Building a product is about fighting the insidious disease of more More features, more fluff, more everything As a builder, you have lost the naïveté of a beginner’s mind The more phenomenon is rooted in fear You’ll never defeat more, but you can contain it with awareness

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

9

I’ve learned to never underestimate the power of 100 little improvements that could be potentially boring to build & unsexy compared to one, large net-new risky feature. Over a long run, those 100 little things make companies appear far more innovative & make a huge impact.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

10

If you can’t identify the core use case of your product you don’t have one. If you can’t identify the core user of your product you don’t have one. If you can’t identify the core promise of your product you don’t have one. Check all 3 boxes, live to create another day.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

11

1.0 is not all your ideas, it’s simply what made the first cut. Which is one of the most frustrating things about a 1.0 - it’s not *everything* you wanted to do, and you can’t wait to dive back in to build more stuff. Always a wild mix of excitement and frustration.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

12

Your product should be a reflection of you. An expression of your beliefs, experiences and dreams. If it isn’t, either you are building for someone else or even worse, to be like someone you are not. Let your spirit shine through your product.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

13

People are incredibly forgiving about what your product doesn't have as long as you have that one great thing

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

14

When building products/features, always try the weirdest thing first, as it only gets harder to get weirder as real deadlines approach.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

15

Increasing the surface area of a product is the most subtle way companies move slower. That’s why it’s so important to be clear on what you’re willing to be great at & willing to cede to avoid the debt incurred by more features. So, experiment quickly & ruthlessly deprecate.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

16

Politicians sell you a product with features that never get built.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

17

The biggest threat to product delays, receiving feedback too late, & seeing if ideas have any legs in the real world is having the discipline to ship a small, well done version of the bigger thing you’re working on & just seeing what happens to minimize confounding variables.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

18

Good product is a function of subtraction not addition.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

19

When do I know is the right time to ship a product? When your product has fulfilled the promise you set out to achieve for the customer. It’s not about features. It’s not about sprints. It’s not about dates. All that matters is you believe the promise is answered.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

20

Most people are afraid to make their products playful It’s a shame because consumers love a playful product

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

21

Most PMs believe giving customers more features and richer customization options will improve overall user experience In most cases, this fails Give people a robust core—the minimum applicable tools necessary to hold that line and watch them shower you with attention

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

22

One of the WORST parts of running an agency for 10 years was seeing founders make things too complicated. They would try to reinvent the wheel, add too many features to their product, address every market. In reality, you only have to meet one simple customer need...

Andrew Wilkinson

Andrew Wilkinson

@awilkinson

23

Instead of asking customers what they’d like to see in the future, instead ask what they’d like removed.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

24

We forget things so that we can focus on the important stuff. It’s a feature, not a bug.

Daniel Vassallo

Daniel Vassallo

@dvassallo

25

The first question to ask before developing a new feature should be, “Is the additional complexity worth it?”

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

26

Tell-tale signs you're listening to users: when they ask for features and you're able to reply back: "It's already getting done this week" and no change in priorities are necessary.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

27

Great products are made of small features.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

28

Most projects that are 70% done are not released because they aren’t perfect yet. However, if you edited down what you have to its very essence, you’d probably stand to gain 90% of the impact if you just released that to the world.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

29

The more complexity (features) you bake into your product, the more surface area for questions will arise from customers, investors and pundits.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

30

Marketing 101: Benefits first, features second. People want to know what your product can do for them. If your product promise is interesting, people will give you their attention. Save the specifics for later.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

31

Some of the things you do in the final few months before launching something brand new: Second guess, change, change back, hone, edit, tweak, cut, sneak in, wonder, defend, promote, remind, rethink, bet, guess, get goosebumps, hold back, push forward, and go!

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

32

Early versions of products have a rapidly growing backlog as soon as you get through the previous one. Once the product starts nearing the minimum set of features to satisfy one narrow use-case, a new minimum set forms around a different but overlapping set of use-cases.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

33

The more features a product has the longer it takes for people to discover all those features.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

34

People will jump through a lot of hoops and friction to use your product if the value proposition aligns with a really timely and strong need for them.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

35

Giving features catchy names is like giving something a handle - it lets someone pick it up and run with it. It's a good idea.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

36

Procrastination helps me understand what’s within reach. If you’re procrastinating, try reducing the scope until what you’re trying to do almost gets done by itself. Reduce features, cut the length, skip some things, lower your goals, curb your ambition. Works wonders for me.

Daniel Vassallo

Daniel Vassallo

@dvassallo