Best 27 Quotes & Tweets on Early stage

Twitter wisdom in your inbox

1

In year one you likely don’t need: - A fancy office - A full-time assistant - An office / ops mgr - 2000+ sqft of office space - Fancy furniture - Lots of employees (> 10) - Perfect design What you do need: A product people love in spite of its flaws. The rest will come.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

2

We are in the early stages of a tectonic shift in work, enabled by software Software is about to eat the physical office Remote work will simply become “work” Let’s compile a list of the best modern tools Anything is game — startups, big companies, hardware, software... Go!

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

3

The first 1,000 hours are the hardest.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

4

This is a never ending thread of the very best online content and resources for early stage startups. Relevant for both self-funded/bootstrapped and venture backed pre-seed/seed stage companies.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

5

The first 12 mo of a startup can be compressed to: 1. Is there demand & does anyone want this? 2. Is it useful & will they keep using it? 3. How do I get more people to keep using it? Interspersed w/ periods of irrational conviction & temp sadness despite nothing having changed

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

6

At early stage, be sure to find some investors who started as labor, then became management before becoming capital. 💪

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

7

I cannot urge early stage startups enough to make a model of their unit economics. It is so telling what will likely cause great, early pain in your startup in the first 5 years. It’ll keep you honest & let you test the accuracy of your intuition. Buffer for the unknown.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

8

It’s not what you start with it’s how you compund. Our entire universe began as smaller than an atom.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

9

If there’s one thing I’ve learned from the last 5 years, it’s this: Starting companies is really hard. Tweaking existing companies to make them better is much easier and sometimes just as fun.

Andrew Wilkinson

Andrew Wilkinson

@awilkinson

10

Quality assurance is the most underrated function for early stage startups. Yes your product works on the golden path. But what if you deviate by 1%? 5%? Your users will. And if you don't fix the "edge case" bugs then they'll never come back.

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

11

People often assume there’s more work to do in the early days of starting a biz vs later on. “So you must have worked nights/weekends at the start.” Not true. There’s *always* more work to do than you have time to do it. It’s just different work, not more or less work.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

12

"Early and often" has been a very effective mantra for me… Ship code early and often. Communicate early and often. Ask for feedback early and often. Share your best ideas early and often. If you're not already, consider doing things earlier and more often!

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

13

It’s not what you start with it’s how you compound. Our entire universe began as smaller than an atom.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

14

Thinking big too early stops you from starting. Thinking small too late stops you from scaling.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

15

Some founders fear charging their users for their product early on. I think it happens out of fear that it's premature & worry it might demotivate them. But I think it's much worse to toil on the wrong thing & waste precious minutes of your life. Use Venmo/PayPal & test!

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

16

At the earliest possible stage of startups, basing your success on the approval of anyone except your customer is basically instant death 💀 Don’t leave it in the hands of others to say no. Make something better/faster/cheaper that helps your customer and solves a problem.

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

17

Early stage startups should probably keep track of two types of runway: * Optimal plan (includes revenue) * Worst case (no new revenue) Be able to execute to take advantage of good opportunity (optimal) but know what happens if it fails— and have a plan B.

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

18

Like personal habits, company habits are formed early and hard to break. The early days - under 10 people - are the most important.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

19

We need more factual stories about founding companies and the early days. Everything except fundraising.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

20

Stages of building the 1st product: "Is this possible?" "Anyone care about my prototype?" "I have 50 things missing I need to build" "Why is growth flat?" "omg things are getting better" "I have 50 bugs I need to fix" "Finally gonna add all the things I wanted in v1" <Long delay>

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

21

My favorite questions to ask fellow founders after they've found success are: - What were first 9 mo like of starting? - When did people start actually wanting your product? - When were things the worst? - Who were your first users? - What did you build that was critical?

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

22

Nothing is more valuable to an early stage startup than alignment. Between the CEO, founders, team, investors, and customers. (And nothing more destructive than misalignment.)

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

23

You reap the change from the beginnings you’re willing to support. Nothing sprouts out of the ground in its final, perfect form.

DHH

DHH

@dhh

24

Growing a startup is a fun challenge. Successful businesses that reach scale often stagnate. The early days of growth can greatly reduce the chances of stagnation as a business scales.

Hiten Shah

Hiten Shah

@hnshah

25

Early versions of products have a rapidly growing backlog as soon as you get through the previous one. Once the product starts nearing the minimum set of features to satisfy one narrow use-case, a new minimum set forms around a different but overlapping set of use-cases.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

26

The most satisfying aspect of seeing lots of early-stage startups is observing not where the world is but where it is going. It's a better world, I am certain.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

27

The Early Adopter part of the curve gets all the glory, but the late majority is where accumulated progress improves the life of the many.

DHH

DHH

@dhh