Daniel Vassallo

Daniel Vassallo quotes on lifestyle

Building a portfolio of small bets. Quarter-time with Gumroad. Building userbase.com. Creator on dvassallo.gumroad.com. Ask me anything at daniel@hey.com.

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1

Many people think they can succeed by making an amazing income, only to find out they have to endure a lifestyle they dislike. You can't be successful if you hate your life. Seems obvious, but unfortunately not widely understood.

2

It’s possible for your income to drop 50% while your lifestyle improves 500%. Don’t forget what you’re really chasing when making tradeoffs.

3

To design a lifestyle based on your own preferences, you must learn how to defeat the sunk cost fallacy. No matter how much you've invested in your current path, you must be be willing to write it all off. Otherwise you'll likely get stuck enduring an existence you dislike.

4

Life is much more likely to improve by removing what you know you dislike, rather than by adding what you think you want. Consider eliminating: - Clutter - Junk food - Commuting - Having a boss - Working a rigid 9-5 - Maintaining a big house - Being far away from family

5

I see lots of money spent on temporary escapes from undesirable lifestyles. Few realize that making the escape permanent is a lot cheaper.

6

You're either designing your own lifestyle or following one constructed by people wanting to get something from you.

7

I want my work to help me design my preferred lifestyle, not my work to dictate what my lifestyle can be.

8

Product first: You start with an idea & try to make it a reality at all costs. Business first: You start with a business strategy & try to maximize profit via prudent risks. Lifestyle first: You start with a preferred lifestyle & try to find business activities that enhance it.

9

My "business plan" is to do the things that maximize the odds of maintaining my preferred lifestyle. Makes it very easy to decide what to do and what not to do.

10

People thinking about opportunity cost in terms of earning potential are missing the point. If you're enduring an existence you dislike, you're missing out on the opportunity to live a lifestyle that better matches your preferences. That's the real opportunity cost.

11

Over the last year and a half I've been arranging my life in such a way that the only consistent thing I do on a daily basis is waking up and going to sleep. The rest is random, driven by what needs to be done, what I feel like doing, and what opportunities I see in front of me.

12

If you like the self-employed lifestyle, and you'd rather not go back to full-time employment, you need extreme risk aversion, not extreme risk taking. You're not trying to maximize profits. You want to avoid having this lifestyle taken away from you.

13

To design a lifestyle based on your own preferences, you must learn how to defeat the sunk cost fallacy. No matter how much you've invested in your current path, you must be be willing to write it all off. Otherwise you'll likely get stuck enduring an existence you dislike.

14

If you like your independent lifestyle, you need extreme risk aversion first, not extreme risk taking. You're not trying to maximize profits. You want to avoid having this lifestyle taken away from you.

15

People often ask me about how I keep myself accountable and work on stuff without anyone pushing me to do so. My answer is that I don’t bother with accountability. In fact, I’ve been deliberately organizing my life to remove as much accountability from it as I can.

16

Enduring a boring existence is an opportunity cost too. If your high-paying job is preventing you from designing a lifestyle that better matches your preferences, it is costing you a huge opportunity. The alternative doesn’t need to pay as much to be worth taking.

17

You will likely live a life based on the preferences of others unless you get used being the odd one out.

18

The weekend is a good time to take stock of your means: your skills, your connections, your free time, your experience, your location, your perspective, your interests, your strengths, etc. Then try to use what you have to design a lifestyle that better matches your preferences.

19

A good life requires frequent pleasant surprises. Take everything for granted, and you’ll extinguish all enjoyment out of life.

20

An obsession with maximizing our potential is probably our biggest fear of missing out. And it makes us fragile. We start seeing only one option (maximization), at the cost of a simpler lifestyle that benefits from serendipity and is more resilient to unfavorable events.

21

Want to work for yourself, but you don't know what to do? How about, improving your lifestyle? Start with that, and the ideas will follow.

22

If your basic needs are already taken care of, your quality of life follows the numbers on your bank account only slightly — if any. If your goal is to become a millionaire, you’re probably going to be very disappointed with what you’ll find once you become one.

23

As you start thinking about new year resolutions, make sure you’re designing your own lifestyle and not following one constructed by others. Whatever you think you want, you might not really want. Don’t unnecessarily complicate your life just because it’s what your neighbors do.

24

These days I spend about half an hour a day thinking about what I'd do if I lost everything. It's a wonderful exercise to appreciate what you already have. In the past I used to want more. Now I just want to try to preserve some of what I already have.

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