Best 134 Quotes & Tweets on Customer centric

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1

If you build for yourself, you’ll always have product-market fit.

Naval Ravikant

Naval Ravikant

@naval

2

A CEO’s first job is to get the company capitalized. A CEO’s second job is to recruit a team. A CEO’s third job is to provide them with clarity so they can solve their customers' problems. A CEO’s fourth job is to get out of the way until one of the above is no longer true.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

3

It's a bad sign when a startup brags that it's disrupting some industry. The success or failure of startups depends on the effect they have on users, not the effect they have on industries. Disrupting industries is incidental.

Paul Graham

Paul Graham

@paulg

4

It’s much easier to turn a customer into a repeat customer than a non-customer into a customer. And repeat customers are better at turning non-customers into customers than you are.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

5

Focus on your customers not your competition.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

6

Build for everyone and you build for no one. Build for one person and you build for thousands.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

7

People often ask “How do you convince customers to XYZ?” Answer: I never try to convince anyone to do anything. There are plenty of people who *want* to do something, *want* to try something, are *ready* for a change. Sell to those customers.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

8

Complexity impresses your peers. Clarity impresses your customers.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

9

If you are customer focused, you're proactive. If you are competitor focused, you're reactive.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

10

No one cares about your product. Who built it, its features, the origin story — it’s all superfluous. People only find value in what your product can do for them right now. Save people time. Save people money. Give people an escape. The selfish hand will always govern.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

11

Most salespeople would be better at sales if they studied the buying process more than the selling process.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

12

When you cancel a service, you can tell if a company is a “Keep Customers” company (hostile, tricky policies, retention mazes, etc) or a “Keep Customers Happy” company (easy to cancel, well wishes, fair policies, etc).

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

13

Build a product to solve your own problem, then hire your customers to solve their own problems.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

14

You don’t lose customers. Customers leave. Losing suggests you had control of them, or that you misplaced them, or you had them and they slipped through the cracks. Customers are in control of themselves and their own choices.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

15

Two things your product should do: 1. Solve your customer’s problems. 2. Get out of the way.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

16

One of the earliest signs your product is getting better for users is that your job steadily shifts from building all day to doing customer support all day.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

17

Prototype the absolute simplest version of your dream product. Use it yourself first. Also include teammates, friends & fools. Then pause for a week. Do you miss your product? If the answer is “yes”, you are onto something. A practical heuristic for future value.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

18

Don't tell prospective customers what 𝘺𝘰𝘶 can do. Tell your customers what 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 will be able to do once they have your help.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

19

People don’t want good products. They want simple solutions that improve their lives. That could mean saving them time/money. It could equate to helping them disconnect from reality through entertainment. You could make their job easier. But people never want good products.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

20

If you make something enough people want and pay for, you will win regardless of what anyone else thinks or says.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

21

Businesses succeed when the self-interest of the business is aligned with the self-interest of the customer.

James Clear

James Clear

@JamesClear

22

Good companies obsess about beating the competition. Great companies obsess about what's best for the customer.

Shane Parrish

Shane Parrish

@ShaneAParrish

23

The best way to save money is to build a high-quality product. - Quality means your customers sell: less salespeople - Quality means your product has fewer issues: less customer service - Quality means your product does more with less: less engineers

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

24

Two important vectors to build momentum in a startup are listening to users & shipping speed. To listen well, you'll need to constantly talk to users & be picky about who to serve. To ship quickly, you have to scope just enough & have good instincts about how to solve the problem

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

25

Complexity seduces builders. Simplicity seduces buyers.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

26

No one cares what you can do, everyone cares what you can do for them.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

27

Save money on marketing by teaching your customers instead of buying their attention

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

28

Never build for a crowd. Crowds don’t talk about your product, write checks, or care. Individuals do. Build for your sister, brother, or best friend.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

29

I’ve reviewed thousands of products Without fail, it’s the products built by people for themselves that continue to win Why? When you are the customer you don’t have to guess what people want Customer focus, incentive clarity & a razor sharp point-of-view creates great product

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

30

Always put your audience first. Your content is for them, not you.

Matthew Kobach

Matthew Kobach

@mkobach

31

Quality assurance is the most underrated function for early stage startups. Yes your product works on the golden path. But what if you deviate by 1%? 5%? Your users will. And if you don't fix the "edge case" bugs then they'll never come back.

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

32

Complexity impresses your peers. Clarity impresses your customers.

Jack Butcher

Jack Butcher

@jackbutcher

33

Social media: Stop asking what social media can do for your business, and start asking what social media can do for your customers

Matthew Kobach

Matthew Kobach

@mkobach

34

People often ask me what product design actually is. To design products is to understand what needs, wants, or problems people have, and to construct something that will help solve that problem.

Julie Zhuo

Julie Zhuo

@joulee

35

When you ask people what they want, they’ll answer your question. But that’s not the answer you need.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

36

It feels good to be praised by your peers. It feels better to be valued by the market. Rather run a packed restaurant than a Michelin-starred one. Rather design a product loved by customers than by other designers.

Sahil Lavingia

Sahil Lavingia

@shl

37

Anywhere there is an inability, apathy, or unwillingness to put the customer first is an opportunity for a startup.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

38

An uncharitable but very useful view of your potential users are ultimately that they are lazy, not very smart, and totally selfish. So if that's the case, the only way our product can see success is if it's easy, clear/understandable, and totally satisfies a fundamental need.

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

39

If your product doesn’t alienate a large group of consumers it won’t succeed.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

40

Copywriting 101. ∙ Add social proof. ∙ Speak to pain, not pleasure. ∙ Acknowledge common objections. ∙ Create scarcity. ∙ Write like your customers talk. ∙ Remove uncertainty. ∙ Use specifics. My favorite rule: An ounce of emotion is worth a pound of evidence.

David Perell

David Perell

@david_perell

41

Founders starting out usually have products, business models and go to markets that don’t work or barely work. In frustration some just pursue any startup-like activity as a short salve. Find long term fixes: Talk to users. Try to fix the product or go to market. Ship & Repeat

Garry Tan

Garry Tan

@garrytan

42

It’s easy to assume someone has to like or dislike something. But often they just get used to something and that’s what they prefer. Comfort and familiarity over better or worse.

Jason Fried

Jason Fried

@jasonfried

43

Doing another startup has retaught me the lesson that once you know precisely what users care about (answering more complex questions, better battery life, etc.), that continuous, relentless focus on attacking the problem can get you further than you or others initially imagined.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

44

When do I know is the right time to ship a product? When your product has fulfilled the promise you set out to achieve for the customer. It’s not about features. It’s not about sprints. It’s not about dates. All that matters is you believe the promise is answered.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

45

Your journey building a startup will have many unfair or unreasonable moments. If you die, few will care. So, get building & talk to customers. There are no award ceremonies for giving it your best effort.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

46

Trying to make a 1000 people happy by chasing primarily the macro-set of issues among them all is a surefire way to make a mediocre product. A different approach is trying to make 10 people really happy then finding 990 people just like them.

Suhail Doshi

Suhail Doshi

@Suhail

47

Most PMs believe giving customers more features and richer customization options will improve overall user experience In most cases, this fails Give people a robust core—the minimum applicable tools necessary to hold that line and watch them shower you with attention

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

48

Build for the obsessed, not the casual.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

49

Work for your customer not your company.

Brian Norgard

Brian Norgard

@BrianNorgard

50

Business: Don’t focus on what you want Focus on what your customer wants Content: Don’t focus on what you want Focus on what your audience wants Life: Don’t focus on what you want Focus on what your loved ones want

Matthew Kobach

Matthew Kobach

@mkobach